Family Friendly Dungeons & Dragons Adventures & Modules

I understand how difficult it is to wade through the official Dungeons & Dragons published adventures looking for kid appropriate content. For the most part, I either use the maps and throw out the adventure text entirely or substantially rewrite their content when playing with my kids.

Once you have read and played through a few D&D modules, I recommend you start home-brewing your own campaigns. Below are links to some more kid friendly content to get your started.

A Single Feather

A Single Feather A family-friendly adventure for characters 1st to 4th levels This adventure is intended for up to 4 characters of 1st to 4th

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Skeleton Dance

Skeleton Dance A family-friendly adventure for characters 1st to 4th levels This adventure is intended for up to 4 characters of 1st to 4th level.

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Dryad Needs a Home

Dryad Needs a Home A family-friendly D&D adventure for charaters 1st to 4th level This adventure is intended for up to 4 characters of 1st

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PseudoDragon Roundup

PseudoDragon Roundup This adventure is intended for up to 4 characters of 1st to 4th level. This adventure relies heavily on exploration and role-playing with

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D&D Easter Adventure

A Dungeons & Dragons Easter Adventure A family-friendly D&D adventure for characters of 1st to 5th level This is an adventure suitable for any level

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Troll Bridge

Family Friendly D&D Adventure: Troll Bridge Based on the old fairytale, this adventure turns an old story trope on its head. This adventure can be

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Manny Gets a Pet

Dungeons & Dragons Adventure: Manny Gets a Pet Manny, the manticore guardian of the castle, has requested the player characters retrieve a valuable and rare

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Family Friendly D&D Content from Other Sites

DnD Adventures for Kids – These adventures are meant to be run by adults for kids, although teenage Dungeon Masters should be able to run these adventures too.

Monster Slayers: The Heroes of Hesiod – rated for kids 6+ with a play time of about 30 minutes. The Heroes of Hesiod requires no previous knowledge of Dungeons & Dragons, and all you need to play is included in this adventure, aside from a few dice, pencils, and some friends to play it with.

Monster Slayers: The Champions of the Elements – rated for kids 6+ with a play time of about 30 minutes. The Champions of the Elements requires no previous knowledge of Dungeons & Dragons, and all you need to play is included in this adventure, aside from a few dice, pencils, and some friends to play it with.

Airquarium – rated for kids 6+. Creatures need not be aggressive. They could be a noncombat wildlife encounter in a setting where they may be a viable choice. However, unlike deer, seagulls, or other wildlife, it’s very likely this “known becoming unknown” will end up with at least one character wanting to get closer, feed, tame, catch, or otherwise interact with these creatures.

Tales from the Yawning Portal contains the module The Sunless Citadel, among others. I would recommend this for kids 10+ as there is quite a bit of battle against goblins and kobolds. Much of the combat can be avoided by roll-play.  Minor edits and omissions can make this a very fun adventure for kids. Ditch the skeletons and rats for young players and ignore the key that opens the door to the tomb of the oger.

For our first run through this module, I made it a rescue mission for the halfling being held captive by the Kobolds. The players were able to secure his release by returning the dragon, which was stolen by the goblins. The goblins wanted dungeon’s entrance to be neutral territory, so they could come and go to their lair.

At the end of the game, the rescued halfling told the characters about two other characters in his party that may be trapped in the lower levels of the dungeon.

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